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2016 NCAA Tournament: Where do 64 experts put UVA in their brackets?

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We looked at 64 different expert brackets and found a few recurring things we couldn't help but notice.

Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports

With 64 teams in the tournament, it felt only natural to look at 64 different brackets from the "experts" at CBS, ESPN, NBC, Sports Illustrated, and USA Today. These findings can help fill out your brackets and see what the experts think of the Virginia Cavaliers.

Championship:

Final Four:

  • Only 2 of the 64 brackets (3%) chose the Cavaliers to make it to the Final Four, compared to 97% for Michigan State.
  • Likewise, experts picked #2 seed Oklahoma over #1 seed Oregon by a 3 to 1 margin.
  • The East Region had the most disparity with UNC, Kentucky, West Virginia, Xavier, and Indiana all receiving picks.

Elite Eight:

  • 81% of the experts predict that Virginia will make the Elite Eight with Purdue (11%) and Iowa State (8%) possibly tripping them up.
  • The other ACC #1 seed Carolina is more vulnerable since the experts are split between them and the #4 seed Kentucky.
  • The biggest unknown is in the South Region between #3 seed Miami 49%, #2 seed Villanova 34%, and #6 seed Arizona 17%.

Sweet Sixteen:

  • Every expert bracket chose UVA to at least make the Sweet 16, joining Kansas and Michigan St. at 100%.
  • #5 seeds Purdue and Baylor were picked more than #4 seeds Duke and Iowa St.
  • All of the #2 seeds were picked to advance in 92% or more of the brackets, even though 37% of them are upset this early.

Conclusions:

  • Since 53% of #2 seeds do not make the Elite 8, Villanova is the popular choice to falter.
  • A double digit seed makes the Sweet 16 once a year on average, and Norther Iowa and Gonzaga are trendy picks this year.
  • Only 52% of #3 seeds make it out of the first two rounds, so experts picked against Texas A&M as a #3 seed to continue this trend.
  • Since only one time in 36 seasons has a Final Four been all #1 seeds, experts think UVA and Oregon look the most vulnerable this year.

Or all the experts could be wrong and the historically unpredictable year could continue to be unpredictable.